Home Information Leaders Discuss the Importance of National Sorry Day

Leaders Discuss the Importance of National Sorry Day

by Jasbinder Singh

On behalf of the City of Ballarat, a message from Mayor Cr Daniel Moloney

“National Sorry Day (May 26) is important to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities not only in Ballarat, but across Australia.

A message from Mayor Cr Daniel Moloney on behalf of the City of Ballarat

“National Sorry Day (May 26) is important to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities across Australia, not just in Ballarat.

These kids are now known as the Stolen Generations.

We acknowledge the Bringing them Home Report, which was tabled in Parliament on May 26, 1997, and included a list of recommendations for the Australian government to move toward reconciliation of past wrongs.

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National Sorry Day

We also recognise that some of our local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community is made up of children who were forcibly removed from their homes and placed in the Ballarat Orphan Asylum, Ballarat Orphanage, and Ballarat Children’s Home, and who have since made Ballarat their home.

National Sorry Day is an opportunity for all Australians to reflect on mistakes made in the past and to continue to build and strengthen a stronger, meaningful, and respectful relationship with our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Contact them as soon as possible.”

Karen Heap, CEO of the Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative, sends a message (BADAC)

“This is such a momentous occasion. I implore the entire community to join their Aboriginal colleagues, friends, and families in reflecting on the trauma endured by so many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who now live in the Ballarat region.

Generations of Aboriginal people have grown up knowing nothing about their families, culture, language, or place in the world.

We encourage everyone in the community to continue learning about and celebrating Aboriginal culture.”

Uncle Murray Harrison, a survivor of the Stolen Generations, poses with Karen Heap and Mayor Daniel Moloney.

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What was the point of Kevin Rudd’s apology speech?

We express our deepest regret for the separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families, communities, and country. We apologise for the pain, suffering, and hurt caused by the Stolen Generations, their descendants, and the families left behind.

Ntional Sorry Day

Asylum, Australian, Australian Government, Ballarat, Ballarat City Council, children, community, culture, Government, Government policy, language, local council, parliament, Survivor, treatment, Victoria

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